The problem is that white people see racism as conscious hate, when racism is bigger than that. Racism is a complex system of social and political levers and pulleys set up generations ago to continue working on the behalf of whites at other people’s expense, whether whites know/like it or not. Racism is an insidious cultural disease. It is so insidious that it doesn’t care if you are a white person who likes black people; it’s still going to find a way to infect how you deal with people who don’t look like you. Yes, racism looks like hate, but hate is just one manifestation. Privilege is another. Access is another. Ignorance is another. Apathy is another. And so on. So while I agree with people who say no one is born racist, it remains a powerful system that we’re immediately born into. It’s like being born into air: you take it in as soon as you breathe. It’s not a cold that you can get over. There is no anti-racist certification class. It’s a set of socioeconomic traps and cultural values that are fired up every time we interact with the world. It is a thing you have to keep scooping out of the boat of your life to keep from drowning in it. I know it’s hard work, but it’s the price you pay for owning everything.

Scott Woods (X)

he motherfucking dropped the truth.

(via mesmerisme)

THAT’S THE PRICE YOU PAY FOR OWNING EVERYTHING

(via queerfabulousmermaid)

this is a super important explanation to think about whenever you feel like telling someone that something isn’t racist because you don’t hate x person.

(via robotsandfrippary)

I probably reblogged in the past, but here it is again in that case.

(via feministdisney)

Mic drop.

(via fuck-yeah-feminist)

micdotcom:

MTV’s Powerful Ferguson PSA Puts the Issue Front and Center at the VMAs

With all eyes (or at least 10.1 million sets of ‘em, judging by last year’s ratings) on the Video Music Awards, MTV has decided to use its platform to make a statement on Ferguson. As reported by the Washington Post before Sunday night’s awards, MTV will be airing a 15-second video during the show entitled “Facing Change.” The short clip is simple: a soundtrack of Ferguson protesters chanting the protest’s signature rallying call, “Hands up, don’t shoot” with a quote by James Baldwin:

"Not everything that is faced can be changed; but nothing can be changed until it is faced."

They are no longer police: Why Ferguson reminds us that America is not exceptional

i’m having a hard time with the ferguson crisis and what it represents in our country. as a white person i am aware of my inherent privilege and because of that i often don’t know how to go about dealing with this in a way that is productive and proactive rather then just an exercise of that privilege.

despite that, i think this article highlights some important associations about what ferguson means regarding the current state of our country, particularly within the international framework. hyper-militarization in america has been happening since the protests against the vietnam war yet americans largely view it as a problem that other nations experience. while the racial implications of ferguson are, by far, most pressing and troublesome, i think this incident has created the space for an even bigger dialogue to occur

tiasiandaly:

mistyslay:

in America, black people are being gunned down simply for being alive, gay people can’t get married/can’t get jobs, politicians say women are asking for rape, trans people are being murdered every day, Middle Easterns are suspected to be terrorists, white men are defended for shooting up schools, teenage boys are building bombs to murder family and schoolmates and yet people still have the audacity to say this is the land of the free

Holy shit.

reading it all in one place amplifies the volume of work that needs to be done. anyone who is being complacent is doing a disservice to us all